The Legitimacy of International Courts and Tribunals

PluriCourts, together with University of Copenhagen Centre of Excellence for International Courts – iCourts, is organizing a combined workshop and PhD course on the Legitimacy of International Courts and Tribunals.

This combined workshop and PhD course explores, assesses and applies different perspectives and standards of legitimacy. Photo: UiO.

PluriCourts, together with University of Copenhagen Centre of Excellence for International Courts – iCourts, is organizing a combined workshop and PhD course on the Legitimacy of International Courts and Tribunals in Oslo, 24‑25 November 2014.

The post 1989 expansion in number and impact of international courts and tribunals (ICs) has led to increased concern about their ‘legitimacy’. Such concerns take several forms, ranging from complaints about their lack of effectiveness to how they are tools of the powers that be – or that their independence from the states that set them up has come back to haunt their creators. What are we to make of such concerns about the legitimacy of ICs? This combined workshop and PhD course explores, assesses and applies different perspectives and standards of legitimacy: Rule of law standards, Accountability – democratic and otherwise, Output and effects – including human rights, Societal acceptance and compliance, and how these and other legitimacy aspects fit together. The workshop brings such considerations to bear on ICs in four different sectors: human rights, investment, trade, and international criminal law.

Programme

See the workshop programme.

List of papers

See list of accepted papers.

 

Organizer

PluriCourts and iCourts
Tags: Human Rights, Trade, International Criminal Law, Investment, Legitimacy
Published Sep. 1, 2014 11:50 AM - Last modified Aug. 10, 2016 12:42 PM