John Rawls' Theory of Justice as Fairness

In this new article in Philosophy of Justice (edited by Guttorm Fløistad), PluriCourts director Andreas Føllesdal introduces John Rawls’ book A Theory of Justice, which is perhaps the contribution in political philosophy that attracted the most attention in the twentieth century.

When do citizens have a moral duty to obey the government and support the institutions of society? This question is central to political philosophy. One of the 20th century’s main response was John Rawls’ theory of justice, “Justice as fairness”, in the book A Theory of Justice, published 1971. The book revolutionized moral philosophy, and Rawls' critics declared quickly that political philosophers now must either work within his theory or explain why they chose not to do so.

The volume Philosophy of Justice, edited by Guttorm Fløistad (Springer, 2014) presents surveys of significant trends in contemporary philosophy. In his chapter "John Rawls' Theory of Justice as Fairness", Andreas Føllesdal introduces John Rawls’ book A Theory of Justice, its criticism and its lasting contributions.

You can read more at the publisher's website.

Read the entire article here.

Full reference:

Andreas Føllesdal (2014) "John Rawls' Theory of Justice as Fairness", in Guttorm Fløistad (ed.), Philosophy of Justice. Contemporary Philosophy: A New Survey. Dordrecht: Springer.

 

 

Published Oct. 15, 2014 5:25 PM - Last modified Oct. 22, 2014 1:52 PM