Seminar on Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the New Law of Foreign NGOs in China

On 8 November 2017, the International Department  organized a seminar on Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the New Law of Management of Foreign NGOs in China with the guest researchers Lulu Zhou and Chi He.

From left to right: Cecilie F. Bakke,  Bård Anders Andreassen, Chi He, Lulu Zhou and Yi Wang. (UIO)

Promotion of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in China

Research fellow Lulu Zhou from the Research Center for Human Rights at Guangzhou University introduced her study on Promotion of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in China. China has ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the government has issued Law on Protection of Disabled persons' Interests and Rights. A series of administrative actions, in combination with the work of differents organizations, have resulted in the improvement of overall living conditions and social status of people with disabilities.

However, disability in China is usually understood in a medical context and disability inclusion is still not a familiar word to the whole society.  Therefore, People with disabilities may face difficulties and discriminations in accessing education, health care and employment. Hence, there is a need for better definitions, knowledge, standards and methodologies in the protection of persons with disabilities in order to monitor the implementation of the CRPD.

Reading the Chinese Law of Management of Foreign NGOs

Chi He, Ph.D. candidate from Peking University Law School presented his research on “Between Stability and Human Rights: Reading the Chinese Law of Foreign NGOs”. In his opinion, stability is the major consideration in China’s thinking of human rights and in the case of new Chinese law of foreign NGOs which came into force in January 2017.

The stability concern can be evidenced from the brief history of China’s engagement with foreign NGOs, which exerted substantial influences in the proliferation of human rights discourse in the legal lacuna period and, inevitably, will dominate the future activities of foreign NGOs working in China. Stability as a dynamic concept mirrors the power interrelationship between state and society within a certain period of time and with the new law, there exists challenges as well as opportunities for foreign NGOs to continue their work in China.

 

 

By Yi Wang
Published Nov. 10, 2017 3:30 PM - Last modified Nov. 10, 2017 3:40 PM